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Incorporating Physical Therapy with Injections

Incorporating Physical Therapy with Injections

Incorporating physical therapy with injections

After sustaining an injury, it is common to be referred to physical therapy to assist you in regaining proper mobility and to reduce your pain. Depending on the severity of the injury, physical therapy can yield beneficial results in a short time. In some cases, you may notice your progress is being hindered because the required motions are too painful for you to perform. Often your doctor may perform an injection right before your physical therapy session to make physical therapy more tolerable. In general, a more comprehensive approach which addresses different aspects of a condition will be more effective than one treatment alone.

Another great example of when physical therapy and injections can be of great benefit is for the treatment of a condition known as adhesive capsulitis more commonly referred to as ‘frozen shoulder’. This is characterized by pain and stiffness in your shoulder joint. This often happens after surgery and trauma due to the immobility that often follows an injury. Range-of-motion exercises combined with corticosteroids and numbing medications help optimize the results of physical therapy.

Combining physical therapy with platelet rich plasma (PRP)/stem-cell injections is another great way of shortening the time it takes to recover from an injury. PRP and stem-cell injections use your body’s own cells to regenerate damaged tissue. Adding physical therapy to the affected area will stimulate the body’s natural healing process and has the potential of significantly improving pain and functionality.

Here at Advanced Pain Management Center, we make it extremely convenient for you by offering access to physical rehabilitation and injection therapies all under one roof.

Distinguishing between neuropathic and nociceptive pain

Distinguishing between neuropathic and nociceptive pain

Distinguishing between neuropathic and nociceptive pain

When determining an effective treatment option, it is important to work with your doctor in ascertaining the correct pain diagnosis. Treatment options differ vastly between nociceptive and neuropathic pain.

The most common type of pain that people experience is nociceptive pain. The human body is full of receptors called nociceptors that respond to stimuli from damaged tissue. It tends to dissipate as the affected body part recovers. For example, nociceptive pain due to a broken arm will improve as the arm recovers. The most common areas for people to experience nociceptive pain is in the musculoskeletal system: joints, muscles, skin, tendons, bones. When you touch a hot object, you immediately withdraw it due to the nociceptors receiving stimuli. This type of pain tends to happen very quickly, compared to a gradual progression. Nociceptive pain is the body’s natural defense against harmful surfaces or actions.

On the other hand, there is neuropathic pain. This pain is the result of damage to the nervous system and is often chronic. Unlike nociceptive pain, neuropathic pain does not need to develop in response to any outside stimulus. Often due to a malfunctioning nervous system, neuropathic pain tends to progress with time if left untreated. Neuropathic pain is typically more difficult to treat and responds poorly to opioid medications. Common treatments implement ways to block the electrical conduction from the affected nerve to the brain.

 

SYMPTOMS:                                                                           

  • Sharp, shooting, burning, or stabbing pain
  • Tingling
  • Numbness
  • Touch sensitivity
  • Muscle weakness
  • Increase in pain at night

 

CAUSES:

  • Amputation
  • Diabetes
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Nerve Injury
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Shingles
  • Surgery

 At times it is common for people to suffer from a combination of both nociceptive and neuropathic pain. This makes it extremely important to thoroughly discuss your symptoms with your doctor to determine an effective therapy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who takes care of the caregiver

Who takes care of the caregiver

Who takes care of the caregiver?

In today’s world, learning to juggle work, family social activities and taking care of ourselves has become a crucial skill for everyone.  This may be especially true for those of us who interact with others who are in chronic pain or are ourselves in chronic pain.  Chronic pain disrupts the delicate balance of daily life and can quickly take control.  Chronic pain creates many clear day-to-day challenges for the person experiencing chronic pain as well as their caregivers and loved ones.

If you are supporting a loved one with chronic pain, you may face certain challenges on a daily basis.  It is important to understand that chronic pain can at times be both a physical and emotional burden.

As a caregiver you may find yourself adjusting to new and different household and childcare tasks.  It is important that caregivers develop support circles and resources to assist with these adjustments, many of which may be long term.

Here are a few tips that may help you navigate:

  • Remember that stress, frustration and anger are common emotions in families that deal with chronic pain.
  • Be patient.  As a caregiver you may have to help your loved one(s) manage many of the negative emotions that are associated with living with chronic pain.  Sometimes just listening to the person can be a great help.
  • Care for your emotional health.  There are many options available for caregivers today.  Whether it is keeping a journal or joining a support group, it is important to find an avenue where you can express your feelings and concerns in a safe environment.
  • Don’t be too hard on yourself.   Try not to feel guilty when you are sad or frustrated.
  • Realize that you are carrying a lot of responsibility and that you may make mistakes.  Being overly self-critical takes a heavy toll on your emotions.
  • Remind yourself that you are doing a needed and important job.
  • Let yourself grieve if you need to.  Your lives have changed in ways you cannot control.  This is a normal part of the process.
  • Remember that asking for help is not a weakness, it’s a strength.  Getting emotional support will benefit everyone in the long run.

 Lastly, expressing love is free and helpful to all involved.